Monday, September 11, 2017

Sarawak's LIBERATION DAY.

Today is Sarawak's LIBERATION DAY.....The Japanese surrendered at Pending at about 5p.m. September 11, 1945

The Japanese Occupation had particular significance to my family.

From the onset of the occupation, the Japanese had chosen my dad to be a civilian worker, a dangerous and hated job. He was only seventeen. Mum was twelve when they came, her parents hid her from forcefully taken to be a Japanese sex slave., when she was fifteen, they reckoned it was too dangerous to hide her anymore. They sought a complete stranger to be married. They married in March 1945, and the war finished in September.

That was the way the world turned, and there won't be me.

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Monday, July 24, 2017

World War Two in Borneo

 As a writer, I struggle with self belief and self confidence. Would people read my books? It feels validated with the libraries circulate my books.


http://link.kotui.org.nz/portal/World-War-Two-in-Borneo--tales-of-my-Grandpa/KBasmRp7pzU/
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World War Two in Borneo : tales of my Grandpa, Ann Kit Suet Chin Chan = Di er ci she jie da zhan : wo ye ye du gu shi / Chen Jie Xue

Summary
"Fiction/non-fiction book", an account of the lives of Chinese villagers in Kwong Tung Bar under Japanese occupation during World War 2
Language
eng
Extent
199 pages
Isbn
9780473339005

Friday, May 19, 2017

grandma's slave


There is on internet a story on "My family's slave" by an Filipino American.

Here's an abstract of my grandma's slave from my book, From China to Borneo to Beyond.

The pronunciation of my Quang Ning dialect MUI ZUI, for a slave sounds like the sour plum, and MUI ZAI as a girl is different. I don't know what it is in other dialects.

It must have been 1900s when my grandmother brought her over to see her slave. The girl was very young.

My father, John remembered fondly of Grandmother’s mui zai (slave) whom he called Ah Jia, (big sister.) In fact he saw her more than he saw Grandmother. Grandmother worked in the rubber garden, the mui zai took care of him and his siblings. She did all the housework. She kindly separated the rough green husk of the sweet mung bean soup, so he would have it as a smooth watery thick soup.

There was talk that the British government in Malaya and Singapore was going to pass an emancipation of slaves, and those not releasing the slaves would be punished.

To preempt this, when this mui zai was 16, a marriageable age, Grandfather Kee Seng arranged for a suitable mate and married her off. This was much to the aghast of Grandmother. Grandmother whinged that this mui zai was paid for by her parents; therefore she was her property. This mui zai was her slave for life. Grandfather Chan had no right to sell her property. But Grandfather would not have any part of this old feudal slavery system. They married her off to someone up the Rejang River.
The emancipation law was never passed and Grandfather never heard the end of Grandmother harping on and on about it.

Some of those mui zais maintained a good relationship, coming back to the family as though they were part of the family. In many cases where they had suffered abuse from their owner and hated them; they never came back to visit. Grandmother’s mui zais never came back. Some, their new family forbidden them to. Grandmother’s mui zais never came back.

Father did meet the mui zai many years later. Father was on official duty in a school near where she was married off to. She came and was hesitant to talk to Father, now an official of the government. She wanted Father to help her grand children to get into teachers’ college. She said quietly that it wasn’t that she didn’t want to visit the Chans, it was because she was not allowed to. She had been emancipated from one family into the slavery of another. She mentioned what a good family she had grown up in, and she would rather be old and single and be a mui zai in the Chan’s home. She loved Father very much.

I wrote about my grandma's Mui Zai in my book. I also remembered my mum almost got a Mui Zai too. It was after the World War Two. My great Grand Mother didn't want my mother to work too hard. So she bought a girl slightly older than my oldest sister. My father declined and packed the girl away. My Father's rationale was at this day and age, him being a Christian should not have a Mui Zai aka slave. How could he have the conscience of having a Mui Zai who slaves away while his own daughters went to school.Ah Tai aka Great Grand Mother argued we we just pay for her in the beginning and don't have to pay her anymore. Mother said we were feeding her. We knew about this returned Mui Zai when we had to do house work. We complained and wish we still had the Mui Zai.
The prounciation of my Quang Ning dialect MUI Zai, for a slave sounds like the sour plum, and MUI ZAI as a girl is different.


My parents had 6 girls, MOI ZAI SEE (bloody useless girls) as my Bodai (maternal grandma) would call us. She said, if we were in China, I would be sold off as a slave. I was the third girl. So would all subsequent girls. She also said my Dad had a Father-in-law look.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

The people's school


The people's school.

People's/Citizen school, Koong Ming/Citizen School is connected to the Chans and the Kongs. My grandfathers on both sides raised money to build the school. They served on the school board. My cousin Kong Chek King is the secretary of the Board of Management.
In 2013, we went to visit the school, and the principal explained the financial situation of the school. Last year, I read a write-up about him attending funerals to raise fund for the school.
THE headmaster of Citizen Secondary School of REjang River has passed away last Friday 75yrs old Hii Sui Chung
He worked as a headmaster n gardener ĺn general worker every day without pay really very great







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http://www.thestar.com.my/news/nation/2015/10/25/raising-funds-from-the-dead-a-headmaster-works-tirelessly-to-get-money-to-ensure-his-school-stays-af/

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Bario Highlands , buffalo

The Kelabits, inhabitants of the Bario Highlands fought against the Japanese. During the rainy season, the buffalo is the best mode of transport.